“Your Stories” Q&A Interview

 

Thanks to Emma Burford, founder/publisher at Business Rocks Women, for this interview on the Business Rocks: Digital Marketing for Women website.

In the interview, she asks about my early entrepreneurial endeavors, as well as for my top 3 tips for women in business (It’s okay, guys, these apply to men in business, as well!). Continue reading

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How Do You React to Mistakes?

I hear it all the time – “If you’re not making mistakes, you’re not trying anything new.”

While it’s comforting to hear that everyone makes mistakes, they can be a small blow to the ego. I’ve made lots of mistakes over my professional career. Some still stick in my mind and return from time to time to serve as cautionary tales.

It’s great to learn from mistakes and look back on them. But another important factor in the experience is how you react to the mistake at the time. Continue reading

“Do the Essential” – and other advice from Valley in Berlin 2017

Valley in Berlin 2017, hosted by Scout24, brought together close to 400 professionals in Berlin’s startup industry for a day of talks, pitches, and networking. There were many speakers whose words I found valuable and inspiring. One thread that connected several of the presentations was the importance of “fluid intelligence” in the new economy – the ability to use past experience to apply to new problems.

It’s not just a matter of individuals needing fluid intel to bring all of their experience and knowledge into the new economy. It’s a matter of vital importance to corporations that have been around for decades, and who must adapt to the new marketplace with either new products or new uses for the products they know how to make. Scout24 is an example of this, itself: it began as an online classified marketplace but has moved into creating a networked marketplace – “to inspire people’s best decisions.” Christian Bubenheim, Senior Vice President of AutoScout24, said in his remarks that this has come to include inspiring innovation not only within larger companies, but also from outside the companies, arising from the needs of the marketplace. Continue reading

Stand out from Competitors by Taking Your Own Stock Photos

Nowadays, instead of pictures being worth 1000 words, social media has come to rely on pictures having space for at least a handful of words.

I’ve seen a lot of discussions lately on use of images to catch the eyes of people scrolling by on Facebook or Twitter. Many of those discussions also warn about the danger of scooping images off the internet and using them in your own posts. Ask my friend about that danger. He had to pay a sizable sum to Getty Images because he made that blunder last year. Now, he himself takes many of the photos he uses for his business.

There are many sites where you can access free images, but I’m not here to talk about those. One of the problems I’ve noticed with those sites is that you start to see the same image in posts by dozens of other people. Continue reading

5 Successful Blog Post Starters

I know many folks have trouble creating blog posts or newsletter articles to promote their businesses. Most of the time, it’s just a matter of figuring out how to get started. Your subject is there, but writing those first two paragraphs can be the most difficult part of the blog writing process.

To help, here are five successful blog post starters to inspire you!

  1. The personal anecdote – Use something that happened to you as a launching point for a greater theme you want to address, related to your clients. Chances are, if it’s happened to you, it’s happened to them. For example, “Where I Get My Blog Post Ideas,” leads off with my own experience in finding ideas for posts.

Continue reading

Things I’ve Learned from Podcasts – #6

Here’s another installment in my series of posts about podcast episodes I’ve listened to recently, along with “my takeaways” from each.

The Accidental Creative Podcast – Todd Henry, “Overcoming Creative Roadblocks”

My takeaways: Henry relates the way a friend’s teacher described the process of a creative endeavor. It’s a U-shape, like standing atop a mountain and looking over at your goal, which is on top of the mountain across a valley. When you start on your journey, you can see your goal clearly. However, when you get down into the valley, that’s where things get thick, and it becomes easy to lose sight of the goal. Henry says the great lie we tell ourselves is that the hardest part of any creative project is getting started but, in reality, the hardest part is in the valley, where we are tested in the following ways. Continue reading